Tag Archives: meditation

Yield to the Present – 10% Happier

Yield to the Present – 10% Happier
Yield to the Present – 10% Happier

“Yield to the Present” was the sign near the door when Dan Harris, the ambitious ABC reporter, arrived at Spirit Rock in Marin for his 10 day silent retreat in an effort to become “less of a jerk.” The book was a dishy read of behind-the-scenes at ABC news, which I loved, and had a lot of good information on his walk toward Buddhism

Dan’s teachers suggest using our native curiosity to train our Default Mode Network to move from Aversion to Compassion. To move from being a jerk, in his parlance, to a mensch. He shows the brain chemistry and meditation techniques to do it, including asking yourself, when you are ruminating on the same thought for the nineteenth time, “is this useful?”

One of his mentors, Mark Epstein, explains on page 164 discussion Dan could become 10% happier because of mitigation of misery, not alleviation. The waterfall of drama is still there, you gain the ability to step behind the waterfall, creating a space to witness what is going on. Instead of the kneejerk stimulus —> reaction, you have walked behind the waterfall of emotion and created enough space to move to stimulus —> response because you are less caught up in the melodrama that is unfolding. You are less attached to the outcome. You have space for a little insight because you are not clinging to success so desperately. Here the metta prayer he learned at Spirit Rock:

May you be happy
May you be safe and protected from harm
May you be healthy and strong
May you live with ease

My favorite part was in the appendix where Dan Harris mentions the research of Jud Brewer, MD, PhD, addiction psychiatrist at Yale. Here’s Jud’s TED talk shows how to calm the posterior cingulate — get it to “turn blue” in the fMRI.

Threshold Choir Audition

Threshold Choir Audition

thresholdLogoLast night I auditioned for the Sonoma County Threshold Choir and by the end of the meeting I was invited to join. Three of the seven women had just returned from the International gathering of the choirs which was held in Santa Cruz. They had been singing for three days and were stoked! Ideas for songs to sing just tumbled out and they enthusiastically explored to make each song sound better.

The “what we do” page says the Threshold singers seek to bring ease and comfort to those at the threshold of living and dying. A calm and focused presence at the bedside, with gentle voices, simple songs, and sincere kindness, can be soothing and reassuring to clients, family, and caregivers alike.

They put a recliner in the center of the room and took turns being the “singee.” The bedside singers would come close and sing gently, usually with two-part harmony and often with three. No Ethel Mermans here, they all sang as if they were mostly listening. I have never before heard singing that was an unspoken dialog.

The feeling of kindness and sharing was open and palpable. The bond of the community was remarkable. They liked that I could blend with the soft and gentle sound and they were very welcoming. I am looking forward to going back.

What reduces stress best is not trying to make it go away

What reduces stress best is not trying to make it go away

Excerpt from an article by Cassandra Vieten on HuffingtonPost

Strangely, what reduces stress best is not trying to make it go away.   Instead, by attending to your breathing, your body sensations or a special word, you bring yourself momentarily into a very basic, nonjudgmental awareness.   Grounded in this place of awareness, you can allow things to be as they are, almost as though you were sitting in the eye of a hurricane.   The stress may still be there, swirling around, but for the moment you are sitting in awareness.